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Ancient Egypt Newsletter 005

I’m back from Java with over 800 photos and short films some of which you can see in the Java special in this newsletter.

Sales of the Imagining Egypt special edition are way above my expectations – I sold out of my stock a week ago but don’t worry if you want one because the publisher has supplied me with another 250 copies.

The theme of this newsletter is women in Ancient Egypt - women were not relegated to second class citizens as was the case in nearly all other ancient cultures. They were allowed to own property, testify in the law courts and conduct business dealings.

This newsletter also contains some breaking news about Hatshepsut, a competition, a review of Imagining Egypt from KMT and a free download.

I hope you enjoy it

Mark

Competition

The first person to email me the correct answer will get a temple of Isis Poster  Tip the answer is in this Newsletter - This is now closed *Click to Subscribe*

News

Mystery of Egypt's greatest queen solved - The mummy of Hatshepsut, the most famous queen to rule ancient Egypt, is found in Cairo museum.
*Click Here*
and
*Click Here*


Temple Reconstructing

Here is part Part Three - making the statues of Ramesses II 
*Click Here*

Imagining Egypt

Here are latest reviews
KMT A Modern Journal Of Ancient Egypt *Click Here*

Durbs is a South African Magazine
*Click Here*

My local Newspaper – The Hereford Times has also reviewed the book
*Click Here*

24Dash review *Click Here*

*Click Here* to read the Publishers Weekly review.

Dust jacket *Click Here* to see it.

*click here* to download three sample pages from Imagining Egypt.

*Click Here* to find out more about Imagining Egypt.

Ancient World Conference

Reading University on 15th and 16th September 2007.
A series of illustrated lectures from a panel of experts such as film maker and historian Michael Wood who is well known for his thought provoking and exciting television series.

To find out more and how book your place
*click Here*


News


King Tut Rules Franklin Institute *Click Here*

Dome to stage Tutankhamun exhibition. *Click Here*

Tutankhamun Exhibition
2007 - 2008
*Click Here*

Thieves find pharaohs' dentists *Click Here*



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Feedback

*Click Here* to email me about this Newsletter

Ancient Letters

Lady Naunakhte's Last Will and Testament
(Ramesside Period)
Lady Naunakhte reminds me of the old lady who left her fortune to the cat’s home to spite her ungrateful kids. Egyptian women could pass on their property to who ever they liked. Lady Naunakhte inherited property from her father and her first husband and then had eight children in her second marriage.

“I‘m a free woman of Egypt who has raised her eight children and I’ve provided them with everything suitable to their station in life. But now I have grown old and my children don't look after me any more. So I will give my goods to the ones who have taken care of me and I will not give anything to the ones who have neglected me.”

The will was signed by all of her children and witnessed by the local authorities.


Careers for Women in Ancient Egypt

By Dr Joann Fletcher
The Egyptians had a comparatively liberal outlook concerning sexual equality because of their belief in a universal balance of male and female. The female deity Maat, symbolized cosmic harmony without which all would be chaos.

*Click Here*

Ancient Egyptian Radio programs & Podcasts

The Role of Women in Ancient Egypt
The information in this pod cast came from essays by Dr. Emily Teeter, Lisa Schwappach-Shirriff, Dr. Gay Robins, and Cathleen Keller. *Click Here*

You can also find lots of info about the Women of ancient Egypt in my book Imagining Egypt *Click Here*

Featured Website

Mastaba tomb K1 at Beit Khallaf - third dynasty (2650-2375 BC) by Ottar Vendel.
This is an excellent description of a rarely visited and remote Egyptian Mastaba with some really good photos – I wish I’d know about this when I was writing my book I would have licensed some of Ottar’s remarkable photos for the pyramids chapter.
*Click Here*

KMT: A Modern Journal Of Ancient Egypt

KMT began in 1990 and is always filled with information-packed articles written in an easy-to- understand style by professional scholars and knowledgeable enthusiasts of ancient Egypt. It has readers around the world and an advisory board of professional scholars from the U.S., Canada, Great Britain, Germany and Egypt. To Find out more and subscribe *Click Here*

 

 Java Special

My wife is from Java and last month she took me to her homeland to show me some ancient Javanese culture.

We visited Borobudur (the largest Buddhist temple in the world) and the Hindu temple of Prambanan. These massive monuments were built with blocks hewn from volcanic rock, are covered in wonderful carvings of ancient people dancing to a forgotten music and were hidden in dense jungle for over a thousand years.

But after an evening at an open air theatre watching Javanese dance, with the temple of Prambanan as a back drop, it became clear that the civilization depicted on the temple walls is alive today. Later we had a second wedding for my wife’s family, in central Java, but this time we had the traditional Javanese ceremony. This involved dressing up in the most extraordinary costumes and parading around just like those ancient figures on the walls Borobudur.

It’s not possible to describe Java in one newsletter so I’ll build a whole new web site on the subject. It will probably take a few months to complete but subscribers of this newsletter will get to see all the work in progress.

So to check out Java, download a free desktop background and even get a flamboyant Batik necktie. *Click Here*
The Discovering Egypt Newsletter
*Click Here* to Subscribe.